Cossette Sun – Community Advocate and Retired Law Library Director

Castro Valley, CA

When I left Taiwan, the government was corrupt and oppressive, lacking freedom of speech and human rights. The democratic movement in recent years has changed the political landscape in Taiwan.

sun.cossette1Who are you?

I was born in Taipei, Taiwan; attended Taipei Junior and Senior High Schools, and graduated with a LL.B. from the National Taiwan University Law School. I received a master’s degree in political science with a desire to work in the United Nations; wrote a thesis on “A Study of Voting Blocs in the General Asembly.” I did not fulfill the dream to become a diplomat, however. I subsequently pursued my second master’s degree in library science and a career in law librarianship. I am a mother of three grown daughters and six grandchildren.

What do you do?

I was law library director from 1977 to 2008 at the Alameda County Law Library in Oakland, California. Being active in the legal community, I have the opportunity to work with judges, attorneys, and elected officials at local, state and federal levels. I was a council member for the Castro Valley Municipal Advisory Council,  and I serve as a board member of the Women Lawyers of Alameda County, a member of the Leaque of Women Voters, and a library advocate. I continue to serve as president of the Alameda-Taoyuan Sister County Association. I work out daily to stay fit, and set aside time to be with the grandchildren.

Why are you proud to be of Taiwanese heritage?

I am proud to be a Taiwanese American. Taiwan is my homeland, birth place where I grew up and was educated through college. When I left Taiwan, the government was corrupt and oppressive, lacking freedom of speech and human rights. The democratic movement in recent years has changed the political landscape in Taiwan. I hope it will become a true democratic country.

What does the future of Taiwanese America look like to you?

The Taiwanese Americans are hard-working people. They can do just about anything successfully. The second generation has many opportunities that the first generation lack. Many have become doctors, lawyers, engineers, scientists, musicians and some politicians. They will be part of the main stream America and hold a bright future.

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